Short Courses


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Short Course I - Biophotonics Technologies for Biomedical Applications
(9am - 12pm Monday, 31 July 2017)

Speaker

Gerd Keiser

Gerd Keiser

Dr. Gerd Keiser is a research professor at Boston University specializing in developing educational materials for telecom optical networks and biomedical photonics. Formerly he was a chair professor of electronic engineering at the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, worked in the telecom industry on optical communication systems and digital switching, and founded PhotonicsComm Solutions, a firm specializing in consulting and education for the telecom and biophotonics communities. He is an IEEE Life Fellow, an OSA Fellow, a SPIE Fellow, and the author of five graduate-level books including the widely used text Optical Fiber Communications and the recently published book Biophotonics.

Course Abstract

Biophotonics is a multidisciplinary field that deals with all aspects of the interactions between light and biological material. The photonics technologies supporting biophotonics have become indispensible tools for basic life sciences research, for biomedical tissue diagnosis, therapy, and surgery, and for monitoring the health and wellbeing of humans. Owing to the importance of biophotonics to all aspects of human health, it is essential that scientific and engineering professionals dealing with the design, development, and application of photonics components, measurement methodologies, and instrumentation for biomedical issues have a good understanding of biophotonics principles. Toward such a goal, this overview course first describes what biophotonics is and then gives some basic concepts of light-tissue interactions. Next is a discussion of the technologies used in biophotonics, which include a wide variety of optical fibers, optical sources, photodetectors and cameras, and miniaturized instruments. This is followed by example applications such as biomedical imaging techniques, microscopic and spectroscopic procedures, endoscopy, tissue pathology, light therapy, biosensing, laser surgery, photonics for dentistry, and health status monitoring.

Short Course II - Optical Wireless Networks
(2pm - 5pm Monday, 31 July 2017)

Speaker

Vincent Cha

Vincent Chan

Vincent W. S. Chan, the Joan and Irwin Jacobs Chair Professor of EECS, MIT, received his BS(71), MS(71), EE(72), and Ph.D.(74) degrees in EE all from MIT. From 1974 to 1977, he was an assistant professor, EE, at Cornell University. He joined MIT Lincoln Laboratory in 1977 and had been Division Head of the Communications and Information Technology Division until becoming the Director of the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (1999–2007) at MIT. He founded and is currently a member of the Claude E. Shannon Communication and Network Group at MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics of. In July 1983, he initiated the Laser Intersatellite Transmission Experiment Program and in 1997, the follow-on GeoLITE Program. In 1989, he led the All-Optical-Network Consortium (1990-1997) formed among MIT, AT&T and the Digital Equipment Corporation. He also served as PI of the Next Generation Internet Consortium, ONRAMP (1998-2003) formed among AT&T, Cabletron, MIT, Nortel and JDS, and a Satellite Networking Research Consortium funded by NSF formed between MIT, Motorola, Teledesic and Globalstar. He has founded in 2009 and served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Optical Communications and Networking until 2012. He has served in many government advisory boards and is currently a Member of the Corporation of Draper Laboratory and was on the Board of Governors of the IEEE Communication Society as VP of Publications. He is an elected member of Eta-Kappa-Nu, Tau-Beta-Pi and Sigma-Xi, and the Fellow of the IEEE and the Optical Society of America. Throughout his career, Professor Chan has spent his research focus on communication and networks, particularly on free space and fiber optical communication and networks and satellite communications. His work has led the way to the first successful ultra-high rate laser communication demonstration in space and early deployment of WDM optical networks. His recent research emphasis is on heterogeneous (satcom, wireless and fiber) network architectures with stringent performance demands.

Course Abstract

Optical wireless network has the potential to serve space-space, space-terrestrial/aircraft, aircraft-aircraft, data centers and metropolitan area networks. We will discuss basic technologies necessary for these networks Free space optical networks has one dimension that is not encountered in fiber networks and that is its ability to reconfigure its connection topology by beam steering in time scale of at least mS to adapt to traffic loads and atmospheric conditions. This tutorial will emphasize the multi-network layer approach to optical wireless networks and how the network architecture can be tuned to the specific applications.